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Toure sets out City ambition
Ivorian explains why he chose blue half of Manchester on day Utd win Community Shield.
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2010 06:57 GMT
Toure could be vital to any title challenge from City this season [GALLO/GETTY]

Midfielder Yaya Toure has played in his native Cote d'Ivoire as well as Belgium, Ukraine, Greece, Monaco and Spain but feels at last he has found a place to call home – rainy Manchester in north west England.

The old industrial metropolis may lack the glamour of Barcelona, where he spent the last three seasons, but his grand tour of Europe has reached an end for the foreseeable future after committing himself to Manchester City for five years.

Although he would not discuss widespread reports that City are paying him $318,100 a week, the affable Ivorian gave many reasons why he chose City rather than Arsenal or Manchester United who he said both courted him this summer.

"City have a great squad and some great players. We can win the title, we can make this club huge," the fast-talking 27-year-old told the Reuters news agency at City's Eastlands stadium on the day rivals United won the season-opening Community Shield against champions Chelsea in London.

Two people helped sway his decision – his brother, City club captain Kolo Toure, and Italian coach Roberto Mancini.

They helped convince him his strength and experience could help City break into the Premier League's top four and ultimately become English and possibly European champions.

Chase me

"When the coach makes it clear he wants you, and chases you and says he needs you to make the team better, well for me, it's easy," he said.

"That's the most important thing for a player, to feel wanted by the coach. If you don't talk to the coach, and he's not interested in you, that's bad. So I decided to come to Manchester City, we have signed some fantastic players and I think we are going to be great this season.

"It is also great that my brother is here. Kolo is a great guy, a funny guy. I play with him in the national team and five years ago we spoke about me trying to join the same club. Now I am at City I am very happy about that."

Scholes pulled the strings in United's 3-1 win over Chelsea [GALLO/GETTY]

While the salary was clearly an attraction, he was more keen to talk about the challenges ahead as they chase their first English title since 1968.

"Even if we finish second, that would not be a failure. There are some great teams in the Premier League and it will not be easy for us," he said.

"But Manchester City is becoming a big team, we have a lot of new signings and although everyone around the world has now heard of Manchester City, there is no pressure on me personally.

"I have played at a lot of clubs, like Barcelona where the pressure is amazing. I have a lot of experience, but I don't think there is pressure. We are going to enjoy it."

Scholes masterclass

Manchester United's evergreen midfielder Paul Scholes took the plaudits on Sunday after a masterclass display that helped his side to a 3-1 Community Shield victory over Chelsea at Wembley.

The short 35-year-old proved the difference in central midfield on a sunbaked afternoon as goals from Antonio Valencia, Javier Hernandez and Dimitar Berbatov secured a win over last season's Premier League and FA Cup double winners.

"It's a phenomenon that he goes out there and gets man of the match, approaching his 36th birthday. He is an unusual person, an incredible footballer," United manager Alex Ferguson said.

"He has had a lot of injuries in his career, he keeps coming back, and it's not easy to do that."

Source:
Reuters
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