[QODLink]
Sport
Wada: 'Agassi issue not over'
World Anti-Doping Agency still has option to pursue Agassi lies.
Last Modified: 02 Nov 2009 15:40 GMT

Agassi's admissions have not escaped the eye of the anti-doping body [GALLO/GETTY]
Andre Agassi's revelations that he lied after taking crystal meth in 1997 may not be as easily forgotten as the tennis star originally hoped.

The World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada) wants to investigate whether any charges can be brought against Agassi following his admission that he lied about failing a drugs test.

Agassi's revelations in extracts of his autobiography "Open", cast a shadow over the eight-time grand slam champion's career and drew criticism from current stars Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal

Under oath

"He took something from the banned list in 1997, we can't do much about that because it's outside the statute of limitations, the eight-year bar," Wada director general David Howman told new agency Reuters.

"Two things need a little bit more inquiry, if he's lied, and he's confessed he lied, so he's obviously lied and he lied under oath then I think that warrants further investigation to see whether there might be any other charges.

"We all know about Marion Jones, she lied to a tribunal, it can't just be one of those things you get away with," he added in reference to the American sprinter who served a six-month prison term for lying to federal prosecutors about her drug use.

"The second issue is, he had a lawyer represent him, does his lawyer know that he was lying?

"Maybe something can be done in relation to that."

After failing a drugs test, Agassi wrote a letter to the ATP asking for leniency because he had accidentally drunk a "spiked soda" belonging to his assistant.

Time limit

Agassi received no punishment from the governing body of men's tennis.

Wada has an eight-year limit on punishment for doping offences but last week former Ukraine pole vaulter Sergei Bubka, a committee member on the International Olympic Committee (IOC) said Agassi should be penalised for taking banned substances.

"It may not be something the ATP has any jurisdiction over.

"It may be that some other agency has to look at it," Howman said.

"We just don't rely on sport to sanction for doping offences.

"These things have to be pursued," Howman added.

"You don't just take them at face value, that it's outside the eight-year limit so nothing can be done. You've got to say maybe something else can be done."

Source:
Reuters
Topics in this article
People
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
A humanitarian crisis and a budget crisis converge in the heart of the human smuggling corridor in Texas.
Indonesian and Malaysian authorities are keeping a close eye on local supporters of the hard-line Middle East group.
Citizens of the tiny African nation say they're increasingly anxious of the fallout after alleged coup.
Assam officials upset that WWII-era Stillwell Road won't be used in transnational highway linking four Asian nations.
Informal health centres are treating thousands of Syrian refugees in Turkey, easing the pressure on local hospitals.
join our mailing list