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Yankees take World Series lead
Yankees hit themselves out of trouble against Phillies in Game Three.
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2009 11:24 GMT

Alex Rodriguez waits for a video review of his two-run home run [GALLO/GETTY]
The New York Yankees fought back from a three-run deficit to claim victory in Game Three of baseball's World Series, with an 8-5 win over the Philadelphia Phillies.

Yankees now hold a 2-1 series lead.

Game Four of the best-of-seven series will be played in Philadelphia on Sunday with CC Sabathia taking the mound for New York against Phillies right-hander Joe Blanton.

Settling in

After a late start because of rain, Yankees starter Andy Pettitte settled down after yielding three runs in the second inning of a game to extend his postseason record for wins to 17.

He gave up four runs on five hits over six innings, including two solo home runs by Jayson Werth in the game at Citizens Bank Park, the Phillies' home stadium.

"We put a three-spot on him and then he shut us down," Phillies manager Charlie Manuel said.

"He basically closed down our left-handed hitters."

Philadelphia left-handed hitters went 1-for-10 with six strikeouts against the 37-year-old Pettitte.

The Phillies treated the sell-out Halloween crowd to an early lead, launched by Werth's lead-off homer to left.

One out later Pedro Feliz belted a double high off the wall in right and Carlos Ruiz followed with a walk. Pitcher Cole Hamels's attempted sacrifice toward third base was perfectly placed and went for a bunt single that loaded the bases.

Jimmy Rollins walked to force in a run and Shane Victorino hit a long sacrifice fly to plate the third run of the inning.

Video replay

Starter Hamels was rolling along, shutting the Yanks down without a hit through three innings before New York struck back with three Yankees bursting out of World Series slumps to fuel the attack.

Alex Rodriguez, who had been 0-for-8, hit a two-run homer off Hamels in the fourth, ruled by video replay to have hit a TV camera atop the right-field fence.

"I think it was a big hit," said Rodriguez.

"It woke our offence up a little bit. Two big runs for us early on."

Pettitte helped his own cause with an RBI-single in New York's three-run rally in the fifth inning, and Johnny Damon, batting .100, cracked a two-run double.

Nick Swisher, benched for Game Two, homered and doubled in the game.

Werth's second homer cut New York's lead to 6-4 in the sixth but Jorge Posada delivered an RBI single in the seventh to restore the Yankees' advantage.

Hideki Matsui, out of the starting line-up with the absence of the designated hitter, added a pinch-hit homer in the eighth for New York, and Pedro Feliz homered in the bottom of the ninth for Philadelphia off reliever Phil Hughes before closer Mariano Rivera came in to finish the game.

"A big hit for us, because it really got us going," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said about A-Rod's hit.

"He has been so good for us in the playoffs. I mean, Alex has been a great player for a long time. He's a big reason we're at this point, what he did in the first two series."

Source:
Agencies
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