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Briatore's QPR future in doubt
Flavio Briatore's ability to own part of Queens Park Rangers will come under scrutiny.
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2009 22:26 GMT

Flavio Briatori, centre, may find himself unable to co-own QPR [GALLO/GETTY]
Flavio Briatore's future as co-owner of English football club Queens Park Rangers is under threat after the Italian was indefinitely banned from Formula One.

The disciplinary action taken against the former Renault team principal for instructing Nelson Piquet Jr. to deliberately crash appears to put him in violation of the Football League's "fit and proper person test'' governing who can run a club.

League rules say that the owner, prospective owner or director of a club should not be "subject to a ban from a sports governing body relating to the administration of their sport.''

Football League chairman Brian Mawhinney has written to the FIA to request further details of its decision.

"Thereafter, the league will consider its position on the matter,'' it said in a statement.

Briatore is co-owner of QPR, which plays in the second-tier League Championship, along with F1 boss Bernie Ecclestone and Indian steel tycoon Lakshmi Mittal.

Briatore is also chairman of the holding company that owns the club and a director on the board.

Source:
Agencies
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