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Kalmadi: 'We will host great Games'
Commonwealth Games organisers shrug off criticism and promise world class event.
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2009 16:21 GMT

Indian construction workers work at the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium [EPA]
New Delhi Commonwealth Games organisers have addressed heavy criticism over their poor preparation and have promised to deliver a world class event next year.

Fresh doubts about India's ability to stage the event had grown since Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) president Mike Fennell slammed the organising committee this week, seeking an urgent meeting with Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to salvage the Games.

Rattled by heavy media criticism following his remarks, the organising committee gave a video presentation and said all games venues, the athletes village as well as transport, security and hotel accommodation would be ready before time.

"We are happy with all the wake-up calls we get," organising committee chairman Suresh Kalmadi told a packed news conference, as he sought to allay concerns the October 3-14, 2010 event was doomed to failure because of poor preparation.

All the CGF's concerns would be addressed during its general assembly in New Delhi from October 6-13, Kalmadi said, in the presence of all senior organising committee officials.

"We're all working as a team to deliver a great Games," he said.

"We respect Fennell's views but we want to reassure people that we will stage a great Games and it will be held on time."

Growing concerns

Fennell quoted a Games coordination panel report warning of at least a partial collapse of the Games while criticising India's reluctance to call on foreign expertise.

Kalmadi, also the Indian Olympic Association (IOA) president, played down criticism of the organising panel, which is packed with sports federation chiefs.

Fennell said the organisers should seek foreign help as they had not staged a major event since the 1982 Asian Games, but Kalmadi said local officials had overseen the 2003 Afro-Asian Games as well as various national games.

Experts had slammed the Afro-Asian games as waste of money after many postponements, also a feature of national games.

The IOA secretary-general Randhir Singh urged the organisers to take the CGF criticism positively, reiterating his view the organising panel should be decentralised to make it efficient.

"It is very, very important for India to stage a great Games," Singh said.

"There is no question of any criticism being taken in a wrong manner or swept under the carpet.

"I felt the committees need to be decentralised and more people need to be working, but we're putting up a joint front.

"It is about staging a world class games."

Organising committee secretary-general Lalit Bhanot added: "We're fully ready as far as conduct of the Games is concerned, in some areas we are even ahead of schedule".

National shooting federation president Digvijay Singh had expressed concern over the slow pace of work at the shooting range. "Yes, we're worried," he said.

"But the pace of work seems to have improved after we raised concerns."

Source:
Agencies
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