[QODLink]
Sport
Indian cricketers urged to accept
The Asian Olympic Committee have urged India's cricketers to accept WADA's ruling.
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2009 16:29 GMT

Indian cricketer Virender Sehwag hits out during the IPL tournament [AFP]
 
 
The Olympic Council of Asia (OCA) chief has urged India's national cricketers to fall in line and accept the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) "whereabouts" rule.

The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) rejected the WADA's clause, backing its players' refusal to sign up due to security and privacy issues.

The Indian cricketers missed the August 1 deadline to comply with the regulations, saying they backed the WADA code but arguing that the whereabouts clause was "unreasonable".

OCA secretary-general Randhir Singh dismissed the cricketers' concerns.

"The players must fall in line with the WADA clause," Singh said.

"The international body (ICC) recognises the code. They should look into the
problem and solve it."

The BCCI has said some of its players cannot reveal their whereabouts as they had security cover due to militant threats.

Players have to inform the designated official where they would be for one hour daily, up to three months in advance.

"Security is not only for these 10 or 11 players, it is there for thousands of other sportsmen around the world," Singh said.

"We must follow rules and regulations, not try and create any controversy this time."

Asiad Entry

Adherence to the WADA rules has become even more important with cricket part of the 2010 Asian Games programme, but Singh was confident India would comply with the doping clause soon.

"I don't think the issue will go that far," he said. "It looks like a question of misunderstanding. I hope the BCCI will be able to explain it to them and the issue will be over soon.

"The players should understand there is no draconian law going against them," he said.

"It is a simple test. In today's world of sport you have to go through this because of the problem of doping."

The ICC became a WADA signatory in 2006 and its board last year unanimously approved out-of-competition tests on cricketers in accordance with amendments made by WADA to the code.

All other cricketing nations have accepted the WADA rules.

The rules state that three missed disclosures of whereabouts in an 18-month period could result in a two-year ban from international cricket.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
A vocal minority in Ukraine's east wants to join Russia, and Kiev has so far been unable to put down the separatists.
Iran's government has shifted its take on 'brain drain' but is the change enough to reverse the flow?
Deadly attacks on anti-mining activists in the Philippines part of a global trend, according to new report.
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
join our mailing list