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Champ Mayweather gives up pension
Floyd Mayweather Jr announces comeback from retirement hours before Hatton-Pacquiao.
Last Modified: 02 May 2009 20:39 GMT

Mayweather knocks down Hatton [GALLO/GETTY]
Floyd Mayweather Jr will come out of retirement in July when he will take on IBO lightweight champion Juan Manuel Marquez.

Mayweather, the undefeated five-division world champion, has not fought since his 10th round stoppage of Britain's Ricky Hatton in a WBC welterweight title bout in December 2007.

Widely regarded as the world's best pound-for-pound fighter – a mantle now assumed by Hatton’s Saturday night opponent Manny Pacquiao – Mayweather, 32, announced his retirement from the sport for a second time in 13 months last June.

'Lost desire'

The American, who has a career record of 39-0 with 25 knockouts, said he would not fight again because he had lost his desire for the sport.

In May 2007, Mayweather had announced he would quit boxing after beating fellow American Oscar De La Hoya on a split decision in Las Vegas to claim the WBC super welterweight title.

He subsequently changed his mind and had been scheduled to meet De La Hoya in an eagerly-anticipated rematch last September after beating Hatton.

Source:
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