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Chanderpaul leads Windies chase
All three results still possible as England push for quick runs in fifth and final Test.
Last Modified: 09 Mar 2009 22:47 GMT

Stuart Broad kicks out in frustration as Nash and Chanderpaul enjoy their partnership [AFP]
Left-handers Shivnarine Chanderpaul and Brendan Nash completed defiant centuries on Monday to lead the West Indies to within two runs of England's first innings total, with the visitors aggressively pressing for a series-levelling win in the fifth and final Test.

The West Indies were bowled out for 544 in reply to England's first innings of 546-6 declared.

The visitors closed on 80-3 off 15 overs in the final 75 minutes, an overall lead of 82 runs with one day remaining.

Kevin Pietersen led the intent with a swift, unbeaten 34 off 27 balls on a day that the TV review system again caused controversy.

England trail 0-1 in the five-match series and must win to retain the Wisden Trophy.

Staying positive

"We've got to be bold. Obviously we've got to stay very positive,'' off-spinner Graeme Swann said.

"Hopefully we get a lead that leaves the West Indies under pressure and see what pressure can do.''

Chanderpaul carried his 21st Test century to a marathon, unbeaten 147 as he and Nash shared a record fifth-wicket stand of 234 that anchored the West Indies innings.

The 34-year-old Chanderpaul, the reigning ICC Player of the Year, cracked 13 fours and a six off 361 balls in 522 minutes.

The 31-year-old Nash, in his seventh Test, hit a fine 109 which spanned 257 balls and 329 minutes and was decorated with 17 fours.

Captain Chris Gayle resumed after exiting with a strained hamstring, but only added two runs to his century.

England took the last five West Indian wickets for 62 to eek out a slim lead and provide a chance to push for an unlikely win.

"It is the last day. The pitch hopefully will start breaking up,'' Swann said.

"We can only hope that the pitch does start to go down a little bit for the seamers and turns a little bit for me and Monty.''

Stuart Broad (3-67), Swann (3-130) and Monty Panesar (2-114) were the most successful England bowlers while James Anderson (1-70) deserved more reward for his efforts.

Nash celebrates his century [AFP]
Controversial ruling

Chanderpaul, in his 119th Test, survived an anxious moment when he was given out caught behind by wicket-keeper Matt Prior off Swann on 92.

However, third umpire Aleem Dar controversially overruled standing umpire Daryl Harper despite limited evidence on the TV replays.

England claimed Ryan Hinds (23) and Denesh Ramdin (15) before tea.

Hinds never looked convincing before he missed a swing to leg at Swann and was stumped by Prior.

Ramdin was undone by reverse swing from James Anderson, who won a clear LBW verdict from umpire Russell Tiffin on the stroke of tea.

The innings subsided swiftly after the break as Swann got Gayle to slap to short extra cover and earned an lbw verdict against Lionel Baker leg before wicket.

In between, Fidel Edwards (8) edged Broad to the wicket-keeper.

England's innings were frenetic from the start and two TV reviews added to the drama.

Captain Andrew Strauss survived a blatant edge to the wicket-keeper off Baker even after the TV referral but failed to take advantage as he fell for 14.

His opening partner Alastair Cook probably should have survived after being given out by Harper but Dar again supported his on-field colleague despite evidence to the contrary.

Source:
Agencies
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