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New witness against Bonds emerges
Prosecutors announce previously undisclosed witness in Barry Bonds' perjury trial.
Last Modified: 14 Feb 2009 14:36 GMT

The trial of Barry Bonds is expected to start in March [GALLO/GETTY]
Federal prosecutors plan to call Barry Bonds' former personal shopper to testify at his trial next month that she saw the former Major League Baseball star's personal trainer inject him.

Prosecutors in the US also said in a court filing on Friday that former teammate Bobby Estalella will testify Bonds told him about using performance-enhancing drugs.

Bonds' former personal shopper, Kathy Hoskins, is the sister of the MLB home run king's former business partner, Steve Hoskins.

She is expected to testify she saw personal trainer Greg Anderson inject the San Francisco Giants slugger.

The filing did not say whether she believed the syringe contained steroids.

Not guilty plea

Bonds has pleaded not guilty to charges that he lied in 2003 to a grand jury when he said he never knowingly used steroids.

Prosecutors also said they plan to call Jason Giambi of the Oakland Athletics, his retired brother, Jeremy, and five other former players: Benito Santiago, Armando Rios, Randy Velarde, Marvin Benard and Estalella.

Prosecutors said Bonds' former girlfriend Kimberly Bell will also testify Bonds told her he used steroids.

They also want her to testify about physical changes that allegedly occurred to Bonds, including shrunken testicles, hair loss and back acne.

The government then plans to call a scientist to testify that those physical changes could be attributed to doping.

Bonds' attorneys said in their filings on Friday that they will ask a judge to bar Bell's testimony about his body.

Prosecutors also said they intend to call Anderson, who is alleged to have supplied Bonds with steroids, and will try to have him jailed if he won't testify.

Anderson's attorney has said the trainer will refuse to testify.

Anderson already has spent more than a year in prison for refusing to testify in front of a federal grand jury investigating Bonds.

A judge could jail Anderson for the duration of the trial, which is expected to begin on March 2 and last about a month.

Barry Bonds arrives at the Court House in June last year [GALLO/GETTY]
Casting the net

Also on Friday, Bonds' lawyers said in a court filing they may introduce the 2006 grand jury testimony of Giants general manager Brian Sabean and interviews former San Francisco 49ers Jerry Rice and Terrell Owens gave to investigators in June 2003.

Sabean testified in 2006 before the grand jury investigating Bonds, and the two NFL wide receivers had connections to Steve Hoskins, who is expected to testify against Bonds at trial.

Rice and Owens had no connection to the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative and have never been linked to steroid use.

The court filing did not detail how the testimony of Sabean, Rice and Owens could help Bonds.

Steve Hoskins secretly taped a conversation he had with Anderson in front of Bonds' locker in San Francisco in March 2003 during which they appeared to discuss injecting Bonds with steroids.

A few months later, Bonds accused Hoskins of stealing money from his memorabilia business, which Hoskins managed.

Further testimony

The government plans testimony from workers at the lab who handled Bonds' 2003 urine sample that tested positive for a designer steroid.

That urine sample originally was tested by a lab used by MLB for its pilot testing program in 2003. The MLB test returned negative, but federal agents seized the sample in 2004 and the Los Angeles lab detected the designer steroid THG in Bonds' urine.

US District Judge Susan Illston said she may toss out three other urine samples positive for steroids that prosecutors said belong to Bonds.

Those samples were seized in a September 2003 raid of BALCO.

But the judge said there was no way to prove the samples belong to Bonds without direct testimony from the person who collected the urine.

Prosecutors say that person was Anderson.

Source:
Agencies
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