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NZ smash Samoa 101-14
All Blacks rule uneven match exposing gulf between rich/poor rugby nations.
Last Modified: 03 Sep 2008 14:55 GMT

Conrad Smith breaks through the Samoan defence to score one of two tries [GALLO/GETTY]
New Zealand thrashed Samoa 101-14 in a lopsided match that once again exposed the ever widening gulf between rugby's rich and poor nations.

The All Blacks ran in 15 tries to chalk up their fifth century in test match rugby and hand the proud South Pacific Island nation their heaviest ever defeat.

New Zealand fullback Mils Muliaina scored three tries before he was taken off at halftime while Conrad Smith and Richard Kahui scored twice each.

Adam Thomson, Jimmy Cowan, Stephen Donald, Ali Williams, Jerome Kaino, Isaia Toeava and Piri Weepu also scored tries.

The referee awarded a penalty try and Dan Carter and Donald combined to kick 13 conversions.

Tri-Nations practice

"We got what we needed to get out of it," New Zealand forwards coach Steve Hansen said.

"There were no injuries as well so it was very pleasing."

The All Blacks' acting captain Rodney So'oialoi, who was born in Samoa but has spent most of his life in New Zealand, said the match was the perfect practice game for the Tri-nations decider against Australia in Brisbane on September 13.

"I think the boys really enjoyed it out there today," So'oialoi said.

"The boys haven't played for a couple of weeks so they really needed this game to turn their bodies over and get back on track for next week."

The Samoans were forced to field a depleted team because most of their leading and experienced players were involved with European club rugby, but they managed two consolation tries through Uale Mai and Alafoti Faosiliva.

Tough competition

"What can you say, one hundred points? But we got two tries," said Samoa captain Filipo Levi.

"It's a big step up from playing club rugby in Samoa but in saying that it was a learning curve and a good experience for the boys."

Samoa made the quarter-finals of the World Cup in 1991 and 1995 when rugby was still an amateur sport but their success came at a huge price.

When rugby turned professional after the 1995 World Cup their best players moved abroad and they have been steadily falling further and further behind the wealthier rugby nations.

Source:
Agencies
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