Malik wins right to appeal life ban

The former Pakistan cricket captain may be allowed to take up a coaching role.

    Salim Malik's career ended in disgrace [GALLO/GETTY]

    A lawyer for former Pakistan test captain Salim Malik has claimed that the country’s Supreme Court has the disgraced cricketer can appeal against his life ban for match-fixing.

    The Pakistan Cricket Board banned the batsman for life after a Pakistan Cricket Board-appointed inquiry begun in 1999 and ending in 2000 implicated him in fixing international matches.

    "The court has allowed us to file an appeal against the ban and has given two months' time to complete the proceedings,'' Malik's lawyer Raja Jehanzeb Akhtar said.

    Three Australian players; Mark Waugh, Tim May and Shane Warne accused Malik of offering them bribes to underperform during their tour of Pakistan in 1994.

    The inquiry's tribunal barred the Pakistan batsman from holding any office related to cricket.

    Malik, now 45, has reportedly expressed an interest in coaching.

    Two lower courts earlier refused to hear his appeal, but a three-judge panel of the Supreme Court on Thursday directed a court in Lahore to record evidence and reach a verdict in two months..

    "I now have hope that finally I will get a verdict against the ban in two months time," Akhtar said after the hearing.

    "I have only wanted justice and I have maintained I am innocent. This case has lingered on for too long. But now I am confident my appeal would be heard and be successful."

    It was unclear when hearings would begin.

    Malik played 103 test matches and 263 one-day internationals between 1981 and 1999.

    He captained the team in 12 tests and 34 one-day games.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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