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Bengals release Henry
Cincinnati release Chris Henry.
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2008 22:37 GMT

Wide receiver Chris Henry ends his career
as a Bengal [GALLO/GETTY]
The Cincinnati Bengals released Chris Henry shortly before the troubled third-year wide receiver appeared in court on assault charges.

"Chris Henry has forfeited his opportunity to pursue a career with the Bengals," Bengals president Mike Brown said in a statement.

"His conduct can no longer be tolerated."

The 24-year-old Henry had been suspended twice by the NFL for his off-the-field problems, which included four arrests from December of 2005 to June of 2006.

"The Bengals tried for an extended period of time to support Chris and his potentially bright career," said Brown.

"We had hoped to guide him toward an appropriate standard of personal responsibility that this community would support and that would allow him to play in the NFL.

"We acknowledge those fans who had concerns about Chris; at the same time we tried to help a young man.

"But those efforts end today, as we move on with what is best for our team."

Local media reported a man claimed Henry punched him in the face outside his apartment complex and shattered his car window with a beer bottle on Monday.

The 1.93 m, 91 kg Henry pleaded innocent to assault and criminal damaging charges.

Henry caught 21 passes for 343 yards and two touchdowns in 2007 after serving a seven-game suspension.

Source:
Agencies
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