Top seeds through in Qatar Open

A tough quarter-final is predicted for Thursday.

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    Brit Andy Murray, last year's runner-up, was up against high-quality
    ground shots from German Rainer Schuettler [AFP]

    Nikolay Davydenko and Andy Murray, the top and third seeds respectively, have made their way into the quarter-finals of the Qatar Open in contrasting matches.

    Russian Davydenko brushed aside Fabrice Santoro of France 6-3, 6-3 on Wednesday, while Brit Murray lost his first set 1-6 against a versatile Rainer Schuettler, formerly the world number four, before coming back impressively to win the next two 6-0, 6-1.

    Tough quarter-finals

    Murray will now play Thomas Johansson, from Sweden, who continued his good form in a 6-4, 7-5 victory over German Michael Berrer.

    Before this year, Johansson had not won a singles game at the Qatar Open in three attempts.

    Murray told Al Jazeera that he was not expecting an easy match against Johansson: "He's got a really good serve, and plays very aggressive.

    "The last time I played against him was a really close match at Queens [in London] a couple of years ago.

    "So you need to make sure he's not able to play too aggressive, keep a good length and see what happens, because he's got a lot of experience and plays really well on these courts."

    No contests

    Ivan Ljubicic, the defending champion and fourth seed, bypassed any upset after his opponent Janko Tipsarevic, of Serbia, pulled out due to a fever.

    Dmitry Tursunov was also given a free passage to the quarter-finals when a shoulder injury prevented Nicolas Kiefer, the 18 seed, from playing.

    Tursunov, the number eight seed, will now meet his compatriot Davydenko on Thursday.

    Argentine Augustin Calleri continued his impressive form after beating Tommy Robredo, the number two seed in the first round, by completing a 6-3, 6-1 victory over Korean Hyung-Taik Lee.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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