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Verbeek named as Socceroos coach
The former Korea Republic manager makes a move to Australia for the 2010 World Cup.
Last Modified: 06 Dec 2007 06:03 GMT

Pim Verbeek will lead Australia through their first World Cup qualifying campaign in Asia [Al Jazeera]

Pim Verbeek, former Korea Republic manager, has been named as the new head coach of the Australian national football team through to the end of the 2010 Fifa World Cup campaign.
Football Federation Australia (FFA) named the Dutchman as successor to Graham Arnold, and Guus Hiddink before him, with the role taking immediate effect ahead of Australia's opening 2010 World Cup qualifier on 6 February 2008.
"After very careful consideration and a rigorous recruitment process I am delighted that we have secured the services of a very experienced and respected national coach for the Qantas Socceroos," said Frank Lowy, FFA Chairman.
 
"Football fans can rest assured that the FFA has worked diligently to secure a coach with the qualities and enthusiasm that will give the Socceroos every chance of success.
 

"I intend to become as familiar as possible with football in Australia and I will be based in Australia and intend to relocate immediately."

Pim Verbeek, new Australian
national football coach

"Pim Verbeek has a vast range of experience he has gained over 25 years in coaching, including several stints in Asia, and we believe he is the right man for the job of leading the Socceroos to the 2010 Fifa World Cup."
 
Verbeek was born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and spent most of his playing career with Sparta Rotterdam before going on to coach the team in 1981, and since then has gone on to hold a variety of coaching positions.
 
"Finding the coach who we felt would be able to guide us through a very challenging Fifa World Cup qualifying path has been our number one priority and we are delighted that Pim Verbeek will be the man to lead the national team," said Ben Buckley, FFA CEO.
 
Strong credentials
 
Verbeek's career has seen him at the helm of some of Europe's highest credentialed leagues and clubs including Feyenoord and PSV Eindhoven in the Netherlands, and Borussia Monchengladbach in Germany.
 
The 51-year-old has also been employed by the KNVB (Netherlands Football Federation) in a coach development role and with the national team in a scouting role.
 
"I am looking forward to the challenge ahead of qualifying for the 2010 Fifa World Cup and I am committed to also helping to develop the game in Australia," said Verbeek.
 
"I intend to become as familiar as possible with football in Australia and I will be based in Australia and intend to relocate immediately. I will be in Australia next week to observe players in the final rounds of the Hyundai A-League.
 
"I am excited to be involved in what is an exciting time for football in Australia and I look forward to assisting the FFA in developing football in Australia and making myself available to support the national football development plan, in particular working with Australian coaches."
 
Dutch style of play
 
Having worked extensively under former Socceroos manager Hiddink at both club and international level, Verbeek has a solid understanding of the style and structure he likes to play.
 
The two Dutchmen enjoyed enormous success with Korea Republic reaching the semi-finals of the 2002 World Cup.
 
With Australia tackling a World Cup qualifying path through the Asian Football Confederation for the first time, Verbeek's excellent knowledge of the region should greatly assist the Socceroos.
 
Verbeek has coached at club level in Japan and has had stints as Assistant Coach at both the United Arab Emirates and Korea Republic, firstly under Hiddink and then under Dick Advocaat at the 2006 World Cup.
 
Following that tournament he was promoted to Korea's Head Coach position where he led the team to third place at the 2007 AFC Asian Cup.
Source:
Agencies
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