[QODLink]
Sport
China's Yi settles in at Milwaukee
The Milwaukee Bucks' first-round draft pick is slowly developing into an NBA star.
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2007 09:52 GMT

Things are looking up in the NBA for Milwaukee
Bucks' Chinese forward Yi Jianlian [EPA]

Yi Jianlian, China's next big basketball star after Yao Ming, is said to be adapting well to life in the NBA with his new team the Milwaukee Bucks.
The 7ft (2.13m) Yi, who had eight points and two rebounds in less than 30 minutes in his side's 91-88 loss to the New York Knicks on Friday, has blended in well with the Bucks and is averaging just under 10 points and six rebounds per game.
"I'm happy to be here," Yi told reporters through a translator before the game.
 
"I know there's a lot of Chinese people watching this game and that makes me really happy."
 
Larry Krystkowiak, Milwaukee coach, said there was room for improvement as Yi grew stronger and more confident going to the hoop, but he said the young Chinese had more than satisfied expectations.
 

"More than anything I love his work ethic and I love his ability to be coached."

Michael Redd, Milwaukee Bucks star on his teammate Yi.

"When you draft a rookie, you never know exactly how that person is going to respond when they come into the NBA," Krystkowiak said.
 
"I think it's safe to say he's one of those people who has surprised some people, opened some people's eyes."
 
Yi was the Bucks' first-round pick, and sixth overall in last year's draft after helping the Guandong Tigers win three Chinese Basketball Association titles in a row.
 
"He's very impressive," said Michael Redd, Milwaukee's leading scorer.
 
"More than anything I love his work ethic and I love his ability to be coached.
 
"He can shoot the basketball and take you off the dribble. A 7-footer doing that, he can eventually be a match-up nightmare."
 
Big future for Yi
 
Andrew Bogut, Bucks starting center, said Yi was a big part of the team.
 
"He's fitting in fine," Bogut told Reuters in the Milwaukee locker room before the game.
 
"He's ready to play in the league, no doubt about that. He's very athletic and very, very fast."
 
Despite falling to their sixth loss in seven road games, Yi said there was a lot of time for the Bucks to improve.
 
"This leaves a strong impression in our minds," the lanky Yi said.
 
"I had two fouls early in the game and it was hard to avoid because (Zach) Randolph is a really strong guy and that contributed to my play later.
 
"But we still realise we have more than 60 games to play. This is just an opportunity for us to think about how to play better in the future."
Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
A vocal minority in Ukraine's east wants to join Russia, and Kiev has so far been unable to put down the separatists.
Iran's government has shifted its take on 'brain drain' but is the change enough to reverse the flow?
Deadly attacks on anti-mining activists in the Philippines part of a global trend, according to new report.
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
join our mailing list