[QODLink]
Sport
Pettitte admits growth hormone use
The Yankees pitcher says he used human growth hormone while injured in 2002.
Last Modified: 16 Dec 2007 09:16 GMT

Pettitte says he only used HGH over a two-day period, and only to overcome an injury [GALLO/GETTY] 

Andy Pettitte, New York Yankees pitcher, has admitted to using human growth hormone while teammate Alex Rodriguez denied accusations he ever used steroids to fuel his performance on the baseball field.
Yankee left-hander Pettitte released a statement on Saturday admitting to using human growth hormone (HGH) twice in the 2002 season while attempting to recover from an elbow injury.
Rodriguez, who earlier this week signed a record multi-million dollar contract with New York, insisted he has never used performance-enhancing drugs when quizzed on the American news programme 60 Minutes.
 
When asked if he had ever used steroids, HGH or other performance-enhancing drugs, Rodriguez answered, "No."
 
"I got tested eight or nine times. Some of my teammates have been tested seven, eight or six times," Rodriguez added.
 

"I had heard that human growth hormone could promote faster healing for my elbow. I felt an obligation to get back to my team as soon as possible."

Andy Pettitte,
New York Yankees pitcher

"Bud Selig [Major League Baseball Commissioner] and Major League Baseball have done a fine job of implementing some very strict rules."
 
Pettitte and fellow pitcher Roger Clemens, who played for the Boston Red Sox, Houston Astros, Toronto Blue Jays and New York Yankees, were prominently mentioned in the Major League Baseball report on performance-enhancing drugs released on Thursday.
 
The report included information from Brian McNamee, former Yankees' trainer, who served as a personal trainer to both the Pettitte and Clemens up to the beginning of 2007.
 
McNamee recounts HGH use
 
"From April 21 to June 14, 2002, Pettitte was on the disabled list with elbow tendonitis," the Mitchell Report states.
 
"McNamee said that Pettitte called him while he was rehabilitating his elbow in Tampa, where the Yankees have a facility, and asked again about human growth hormone. Pettitte stated that he wanted to speed his recovery and help his team.
 
"McNamee traveled to Tampa at Pettitte's request and spent about 10 days assisting Pettitte with his rehabilitation.
 
"McNamee recalled that he injected Pettitte with human growth hormone that McNamee obtained from [Kirk] Radomski on two to four occasions. Pettitte paid McNamee for the trip and his expenses; there was no separate payment for the human growth hormone."
 
Pettitte comes clean
 
Pettitte came clean on Saturday, admitting that the Mitchell Report, as it pertained to him, was accurate.
 
"In 2002 I was injured," Pettitte said in a statement.
 
"I had heard that human growth hormone could promote faster healing for my elbow. I felt an obligation to get back to my team as soon as possible.
 
"For this reason, and only this reason, for two days I tried human growth hormone. Though it was not against baseball rules, I was not comfortable with what I was doing, so I stopped.
 
"This is it - two days out of my life; two days out of my entire career, when I was injured and on the disabled list."
 
Pettitte had a 15-9 win/loss record with a 4.05 earned run average (ERA) in 2007 and has a career 201-113 record with a 3.83 ERA in 13 seasons with the Yankees and the Houston Astros.
Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
Remnants of deadly demonstrations to be displayed in a new museum, a year after protests pushed president out of power.
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.