Boje questioned by Indian police

Former South African bowler is questioned in match-fixing probe.

    Nicky Boje: Claims a wicket, but did he have money
    on it? [GALLO/GETTY
    ]
    Indian police have questioned former South Africa left-arm spinner Nicky Boje in connection with the 2000 match-fixing scandal which led to a life ban for former captain Hansie Cronje.

    "We've interrogated him in all the aspects of the case," Satyendra Garg, the additional police commissioner for crime, said.

    "Questions were asked on all aspects of the case and Boje answered them."

    He said Boje had denied any involvement.

    Boje, 34, who retired from international cricket in 2006, Herschelle Gibbs and Cronje were named in a Delhi police investigation during South Africa's tour in 2000.

    Cronje, who was banned for life after admitting taking money to influence matches, died in a plane crash in 2002.

    Gibbs, who accepted an offer of money from Cronje to under-perform, was banned for six months.

    "We'll do further investigations to finalise the case," Garg said.

    "The case is still open and there are yet more investigations to be done."

    Boje was questioned after arriving in India to play in the unofficial Indian Cricket League Twenty20 series.

    Gibbs appeared for questioning when he took part in last year's ICC Champions
    Trophy.

    "I was called in for questioning in an old matter by the Delhi police," Boje later said in an ICL statement.

    "I met up with them and have responded to the queries raised by them.

    "I look forward to continue playing in the ICL Twenty20 tournament."

    SOURCE: Agencies


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