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Charlton coaches Cambodian kids
British football legend Sir Bobby Charlton leads a training session in Phnom Penh.
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2007 08:39 GMT
British football legend Sir Bobby Charlton shows he's still got it at a Cambodian training session [AFP]
Sir Bobby Charlton, British football legend, led a training session in Phnom Penh for young Cambodian players, to breathe some life into the ailing football set-up in the impoverished country.
Charlton arrived on Tuesday for a four-day visit in Cambodia along with Tony Hawk, renowned American skateboarder, to take part in a landmine victim awareness programme.

Charlton, known as a complete footballer during his playing career, spent half an hour at the training session with more than 80 children under 13 years old, showing them his skills at the national football centre's ground.

During the training, Charlton urged the children to practice hard at home and to use "correct techniques" when they play.

"It's something that you have to do yourself, we cannot do it for you," said Charlton, who scored 49 goals in 106 international matches and was crucial to England's 1966 World Cup victory.

The 69-year-old added that opportunities for footballers will grow in Cambodia as more and more players and coaches get involved in the sport.

Hai Vy, a thirteen-year-old participant in the training session said he admired Charlton's skill.

"I do not know him. But he showed us good football techniques," Hai Vy said.

"This will help us a lot."

Khek Ravy, vice president of the Football Federation of Cambodia, said Cambodian coaches would use Charlton's methods to train the children.

"He trained us in the skills of passing and shooting... It is so important," Khek Ravy said.

Thrashed by its opponents abroad and plagued by scandal at home, the national team is currently ranked 169th in the world.

Source:
Agencies
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