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Princess Haya for IOC
Jordan's Princess Haya Bint Al-Hussein in line for Olympic job.
Last Modified: 02 May 2007 15:15 GMT

President of the FEI Princess Haya of Jordan kisses Virgine Atger of France during the presentation ceremony on the podium of Team Endurance Championship [GALLO/GETTY]

Princess Haya of Jordan is among four people in line to become new members of the International Olympic Committee.
 
Haya, Patrick Baumann of Switzerland, Andres Botero of Colombia and Rita Subowo of Indonesia have been nominated for membership by IOC president Jacques Rogge and the executive board.
Their election, considered a rubber stamp, will take place at the IOC session in Guatemala City in July.
 
"These are four highly competent individuals who would undoubtedly make an excellent contribution to the IOC and its work around the world," Rogge said.

Rogge noted that two of the nominees were women, as was the case in 2006.

The new appointments will bring the number of female members to 14 out of a total of 111, roughly 12 percent of the total membership.

"This reflects the IOC's desire to lead by example as regards our policy of increasing the number of women in sports organisations," Rogge said.

Haya was elected last year as president of the International Equestrian Federation, one of 28 sports represented in the Summer Olympics.

Haya is also the wife of Dubai's Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum.

Source:
Agencies
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