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Bright future for Bangladesh
Tigers coach Dav Whatmore says prospects are good for his young cricket side.
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2007 09:20 GMT

Bangladesh cricket coach Dav Whatmore is ready to take on the big boys [GALLO/GETTY]

Dav Whatmore, Bangladesh coach, envisions a golden future for his young side who knocked out India to gain a place in the World Cup Super Eight Series where they will face Australia, Whatmore's own country, in their next match in Antigua on Saturday.
"It's terrific," said Whatmore of his team whose average age is just 22.
 
"We've got a couple of more experienced players, but the vast majority of them are under 25, which is absolutely perfect for an emerging team like us.

"They now have an absolutely wonderful opportunity to play against seven of the world's best sides and they will grow enormously because of that experience," he added, perhaps forgetting that Ireland also made it through to the Super Eights.

"I understand that we are still ranked number nine in the world and have a long way to go before we are consistently challenging the big boys.

"But we've got the resources and talent to really progress and we will be going to the Super Eights to really enjoy ourselves.

"And from a personal point of view it's great to be in a position where your team is playing well and your methods are being validated," said Whatmore.

The 53 year-old is no stranger to World Cup glory having been at the helm when Sri Lanka won the title in 1996, and is looking for more success after Bangladesh made the second round with a nervy seven-wicket victory over Bermuda on Sunday.

"I thought the game (against Bermuda) was an extremely difficult one and the boys did brilliantly to keep their focus," said Whatmore.

"I know we were only chasing a small total (96), but the ball was doing all sorts of things out there in the first ten overs, and it took a very brave batting performance from the middle order to get us through.

"They've never really been in that situation before, with so much on the line and with so much to lose," added the Sri Lankan-born coach.

A bit of luck

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"This is a good lesson for them (India), to lose to the team of Bangladesh, consisting of mostly very young players."

baz, Vancouver, Canada

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"This is very significant for us. It's something we always believed we could do if we played to the best of our ability and had a little bit of luck."

"We were the first team to arrive in the Caribbean and had a couple of extra matches in the conditions against Canada and Bermuda," Whatmore said.

"We've only had one training session called off because of bad weather and in general our preparation has been as thorough and as focused as it possibly could be.

"People might think we've caused upsets, but we knew deep down that we were capable of beating the best teams on our day."

Bangladesh face defending World Cup champions Australia on Saturday, before playing New Zealand also in Antigua on April 2 in their first Super Eight matches.

Source:
Agencies
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