Speculation

 

Amid local media reports that Woolmer was strangled, investigators have called in an American pathologist to help determine the cause of death. An initial autopsy was inconclusive.

 

Mark Shields, the deputy police superintendent, did not identify the pathologist.

 

Police have called Woolmer's death "suspicious", but have stopped short of saying it was being investigated as a murder.

 

Gill Woolmer has not ruled out murder as the cause of her husband's death.

 

"I mean some of the cricketing fraternity, fans are extremely volatile and passionate about the game and what happens in the game, and also a lot of it in Asia, so I suppose there is always the possibility that it could be that [murder]," she told Britain's Sky Sports in an interview from her home in Cape Town, South Africa.

 

The Jamaica Gleaner newspaper, citing an unnamed high-ranking police officer, reported on Thursday that authorities had found a bone broken in Woolmer's neck and that investigators were treating the case as a homicide.

 

Gambling

 

The Jamaica Observer newspaper, citing unnamed sources, reported that Woolmer's body had marks on the throat and that bones in the lower part of his face were broken.

 

On Wednesday, a forensics team spent hours combing Woolmer's room on the 12th floor and reviewing security cameras from the Pegasus Hotel in Kingston, Jamaica.

 

A former Pakistani player speculated that the coach was killed by gambling interests and a Pakistan team official said there was blood and vomit in the room when Woolmer was found.