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Victory changes Colts' character
A Super Bowl victory gives people a different view of the Indianapolis Colts.
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2007 09:30 GMT

Peyton Manning at the Colts' victory parade {GALLO/GETTY]

Peyton Manning's reputation managed for underachiever to great in the course of one game, but the Indianapolis quarterback didn't want to get too focused on his MVP award.

"Man, legacy, that's a deep word for me," the 29-year-old Manning said.

"I don't worry about that, especially in what I consider to be in the middle of my career."
The victory changed the way many people viewed the Colts, erasing the questions which hung over not only Manning but the whole team about their ability to perform in big games.

"We have done what a lot of people thought we couldn't do," said Dominic Rhodes, who led the Colts' running backs with 21 carries for 110 yards and one touchdown in the 29-17 victory over Chicago.
  
In their charge to Super Bowl glory the Colts proved they are a team that can win in any type of situation.

They beat Baltimore 15-6 in an all-field goal struggle in the quarter-finals, rallied from an 18-point deficit to beat their nemesis New England 38-34 in the American Football Conference final and beat the Bears in the driving rain in Miami.
  
"We showed this year we can win any number of different ways," said Colts coach Tony Dungy, who is yet to decide whether to continue his coaching career.

"We won against Kansas City by shutting down their running game. We went to Baltimore and won with field goals and defence.
  
"We beat New England and we had to score 30 points in the second half and our defence exploded and did this and that."
  
After falling behind 7-0 to Chicago on the opening kickoff return of the game Sunday, Indianapolis stayed focused.
  
"It was a team effort," Colts centre Jeff Saturday said. "We ran the ball well. Peyton did a great job of putting us in good plays.
  
"Everybody talked trash about our defence and that they couldn't get it done in the playoffs.
  
"They helped us win those games. They are unbelievable. We all believed in each other and that is how you win championships."
  
Colts linebacker Cato June said they never doubted each other.
  
"Everybody told us we couldn't do it and we made it happen," June said. "It was about us playing together, playing as one, outplaying their defence and outplaying their special teams. We got it done. It feels great for everybody."
  
Colts Adam Vinatieri kicked his way into the record books, becoming the career leader in Super Bowl field goals.
  
Vinatieri booted three field goals Sunday to boost his record to seven, two more than the previous record holder Ray Wersching of the San Francisco 49ers.
  
Vinatieri, who previously won Super Bowls with New England, said he always believed in the team.
  
"They just couldn't get over the hump," he said. "I kind of felt like the stars were aligned right and I wanted to jump in and see if I could be a person that could help the team a little bit."

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