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Parreira threatened with arrest
The new South Africa coach is not allowed to lift a pen without a permit.
Last Modified: 12 Feb 2007 10:08 GMT

Breaking the rules: Carlos Parreira, front, trains with the national squad in Johannesburg [EPA]

Carlos Alberto Parreira, South Africa's new national football coach, was warned on Monday that he would be arrested if he tries to turn up at any matches after a bungle over his work permit in South Africa.
The Brazilian, who led his national side to World Cup glory in 1994, was hired by the South African Football Association (SAFA) on a multi-million dollar contract to coach them through the South African-hosted 2010 World Cup.

However Mantshele Tau, a home affairs ministry spokesman, said that the new coach must not even take notes off the television, as that would be breaking work permit laws.

"The law is very clear... Parreira and his assistant (fellow Brazilian Jairo Leal) are not allowed to work until their documentation is sorted out," Tau told AFP.

"He is not even allowed to go to the stadium or take notes while watching TV because that amounts to work."

Parreira's employers SAFA downplayed the situation when news emerged on Friday that their new recruit was yet to secure a work permit, saying it was all being sorted out, however the home affairs ministry is taking a hard line on the coach who is being paid more than $8,000 a day.

"He can't report to SAFA offices or hold training sessions," said Tau.

"We have monitoring systems in place and if he is found (working) he will be arrested, while his employers could also be fined."

Documentation required

Parreira arrived in South Africa at the end of January after signing a four-year deal with SAFA more than six months ago, and has already held a three-day training camp in Johannesburg with a 23-man squad as well as attending a number of local games to identify potential Bafana Bafana players.

The 64 year-old arrived in the country on a tourist visa, with SAFA admitting it had been slow in beginning the process of applying for employment visas for Parreira and Leal, as they are awaiting police and medical documents for the pair.

South Africa has notoriously severe work visa requirements for foreigners, including detailed medical and police records from their homelands and other places where they have been employed.

Parreira has previously coached in the United States, Turkey, Spain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Ghana.

Source:
Agencies
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