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50 for Hafeez
Mohammed Hafeez puts Pakistan in control in the third Test.
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2006 14:41 GMT

Worth the wait: Mohammed Hafeez celebrates his 50

Opener Mohammed Hafeez half-century helped Pakistan tighten their grip on the third Test against the West Indies in Karachi.

Hafeez's 57 helped his side build up a 174 run lead with eight wickets in hand at stumps.

He'll start day four at the crease with Mohammad Yousuf unbeaten on one with their second innings total standing at 130-2.
Runs were hard to come by, as the home side made just 61 runs in the second session for the loss of opener Imran Farhat (20).

The sluggish pace continued after tea when Hafeez crawled to his fourth Test half-century in 213 minutes, hitting just boundaries.

"We had to see off the new ball and that was why we were  cautious initially. Moreover it was tough to play strokes on this pitch. It has eased up slightly but it's still not good," said Hafeez.
  
Lackadaisical fielding continued when Dwayne Bravo dropped Younis off his own bowling on 19.

Earlier, Ramdin hit a gritty 50 to keep alive his team's chances of levelling the series. He added 44 runs for the last wicket with Corey Collymore (eight not out) to help West Indies recover from 216-9 to 260 all out.

Source:
Agencies
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