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Witness
Nablus Restricted
The frustrations and despair of two import-export agents battling to get their clients' goods in and out of Nablus.
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2010 13:42 GMT

The free movement of goods and labour is key to building businesses anywhere in the world.

But in the occupied West Bank, with no direct air or sea port, all goods and people coming in and out of the region are subject to stringent controls imposed by Israel.

Filmmaker Tom Evans and field producer Ghassan Khader spent a month following two import-export agents in Nablus.

Their work is constantly frustrated by controls restrictions - every permit needs fighting for and they are powerless in the face of endless unexplained delays and confiscations at customs.

This is the second film in the series The Business of Occupation and takes a personal look at the realities of the Nablus economy under Israeli occupation.

Nablus Restricted can be seen from Tuesday, September 21, at the following times GMT: Tuesday: 0830, 1900; Wednesday: 0330, 1400, 2330.

Source:
AL Jazeera
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