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Witness
Singing Policemen of Bihar
How a travelling police choir in India's poorest state raise rail safety awareness.
Last Modified: 18 Jun 2009 06:51 GMT

Watch part two

The state of Bihar in India is notorious for having the highest crime rate in the country.

But the Bihar state police force is totally ill-equipped to handle the spiraling crime rate. It is still carrying World War I rifles and is confounded by reports of high-level collaboration between criminals and politicians.

Now, Bihar policemen have found a new way to try to fight crime.

They have created a police choir to sing songs spreading awareness about safe rail travel. They focus is on the rail network, since a great deal of crime occurs on the railways which is the principle system of transport for most Indians.

They take their singing seriously. Crime prevention is no frivolous matter in a state which has become a synonym for runaway crime rates. And the passengers are thrilled.

Bihar has a vibrant tradition of folk music, and singing has proved to be the perfect vehicle to deliver a mass message in a state with a high illiteracy rate.

The film follows the uniformed policemen in song - in train compartments, busy rail platforms, fairs and festivals.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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