[QODLink]
Witness
Children of the Cedars
A young Dutch man travels to Beirut to piece together his Lebanese past.
Last Modified: 26 May 2009 15:50 GMT

Watch part two                     Watch part three                     Watch part four

Filmmaker: Dimitri Khodr

The adoption of children across international borders is hugely controversial.

Arthur Block has always been haunted by his adoption from Lebanon when he was just six months old. Now, he is determined to lay some ghosts to rest.

He was adopted from Lebanon in 1976 - a year after the civil war started and while disorder and corruption was rife.

Twenty-seven years after being adopted into a loving Dutch family, he decided to travel back to Beirut to piece together his past.

Filmmaker Dimitri Khodr records Arthur's emotional journey as he investigates the taboo subject of the adoption of the children of the cedars, so called because the cedar is Lebanon's national symbol.

This honest film is layered with reflection using the power of film to unravel and confront complex feelings as well as simply recording Arthur's journey.

When he takes desperate measures to track down his biological mother the story takes a powerful turn leaving Arthur faced with some very difficult decisions.

Children of the Cedars follows Arthur's search for his parents, the truth and himself.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.