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Witness
Red Oil
An inside look at the financial engine behind Chavez's socialist government.
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2009 07:36 GMT



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Filmmakers: Lucinda Broadbent and Aimara Reques

Ever since Hugo Chavez, the Venezuelan president, was elected in 1998, he has polarised opinion both at home and abroad with his strong socialist ideals.

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He has used the country's vast oil reserves to fund this social revolution.

Moves have included nationalising the Venezuelan state oil company, the PDVSA, and the billions of dollars it pumps into the economy every year.
 
Filmmaker Lucinda Broadbent and journalist Aimara Reques take an imaginative look at the on-going oil saga in Venezuela.

They introduce us to some of the star players on both sides of the Chavez divide as they chronicle the passionate power struggles, feuds, strikes and victories, as well as the murkier side of the fight for Venezuela's Red Oil.

The film follows the dramatic ups and downs of Venezuela's state oil company as Chavez takes control with the aim of using its profits to further socialistic goals.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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