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Witness
Gulabi Gang
The Gulabi Gang fights injustice against women and low casts in rural India.
Last Modified: 04 Mar 2010 08:32 GMT

Watch part two

Filmmaker: Ian Pritchard

The caste system was once an immutable fact of life in India, a rigid hierarchy underpinned by the "untouchables", a group condemned to subsist on the margins of society.

Today, the untouchables are known as Dalits and discrimination against them is banned by the constitution, which is not to say that it does not exist.  
 
Another continuing area of discrimination is against women. In fact, "not only is it a curse to be a Dalit, but it is just as difficult being a woman".

These are the words of a member of an extraordinary citizens group, the Gulabi Gang, which fights for the rights of the poor, Dalit and non-Dalit alike.

"Gulabi" means pink, and the gang's female members are distinguished by the bright pink saris they wear. 
 
The Gulabi Gang was set up by Sampat Pal Devi, an ordinary mother desperate to tackle the discrimination experienced by women around her.

Her activities sometimes put her on the wrong side of the law, but as Ian Pritchard's film shows, her courage and her work are testament to the power of ordinary people to enforce change. 
 
Gulabi Gang can be seen from Thursday, March 4, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 0830, 1900; Friday: 0330, 1400, 2330.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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