[QODLink]
Witness
The Bushmen Business
The San people have adapted their age-old traditions and talents to new markets.
Last Modified: 16 Apr 2009 08:44 GMT

Watch part two

Filmmaker: Dominik von Eisenhart - Rothe

For decades, the San people of Southern Africa were known, by Whites at least, as the Bushmen of the Kalahari.

They were oppressed and thrown off their land by white settlers. They were seen as nothing more than primitive hunter gatherers with no future.

But as apartheid ended and African people began to rediscover and re-assert their identity, they threw off the condescending name of Bushmen and became what they always were, the San people.

But throwing off 300 years of oppression and racial discrimination is not that simple. Changing your name does not change your circumstances.

The Bushmen Business, by Dominik Eisenhart Roth is a film which captures the difficulties the San people are facing to regain their heritage and culture whilst at the same time benefiting from modern developments.

Because those same modern developments threaten to undermine the very basis of what it means to be San. Can you be a hunter-gatherer in the modern age?

This episode of Witness airs on Thursday, April 16, 2009 at 0830GMT and 1900GMt with repeats at 0330GMT, 1400 and 2330GMT on Friday.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.