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Witness
The Bushmen Business
The San people have adapted their age-old traditions and talents to new markets.
Last Modified: 16 Apr 2009 08:44 GMT

Watch part two

Filmmaker: Dominik von Eisenhart - Rothe

For decades, the San people of Southern Africa were known, by Whites at least, as the Bushmen of the Kalahari.

They were oppressed and thrown off their land by white settlers. They were seen as nothing more than primitive hunter gatherers with no future.

But as apartheid ended and African people began to rediscover and re-assert their identity, they threw off the condescending name of Bushmen and became what they always were, the San people.

But throwing off 300 years of oppression and racial discrimination is not that simple. Changing your name does not change your circumstances.

The Bushmen Business, by Dominik Eisenhart Roth is a film which captures the difficulties the San people are facing to regain their heritage and culture whilst at the same time benefiting from modern developments.

Because those same modern developments threaten to undermine the very basis of what it means to be San. Can you be a hunter-gatherer in the modern age?

This episode of Witness airs on Thursday, April 16, 2009 at 0830GMT and 1900GMt with repeats at 0330GMT, 1400 and 2330GMT on Friday.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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