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Witness
Safe Haven
Two survivors of the genocide of Muslims in the war in Bosnia return to visit Srebrenica.
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2010 11:33 GMT

To watch part two click here

Filmmaker: Fiona Lloyd Davis

The war in Bosnia tore once peaceful communities apart. Serbs and Muslims killed each other with a viciousness that shocked a so-called civilised Europe that had not seen such carnage since the second world war.

In an attempt to stop the blood letting the United Nations declared the town of Srebrenica in eastern Bosnia a "safe haven".

A Dutch peacekeeping force was stationed there to protect the mainly Muslim inhabitants and keep the ethnically divided population apart.

It did not work out that way. In July 1995, Bosnian Serb troops were set to overrun the town. The Muslim men who had been defending the town of Srebrenica tried to escape, but were rounded up and massacred.

8,000 Bosnian Serbs were killed. The International Court of Justice just recently admitted that it was genocide.

Two survivors return to Srebrenica for a visit. Neither feel they can return to live there but they go back for the memorial service to honor the dead and bury the victims that keep being discovered in mass graves throughout the region. 

Safe Haven can be seen from Tuesday, June 15, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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