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Witness
Soweto Beach Party
How Afrikaans could be making a resurgence among South Africa's black community.
Last Modified: 22 Jun 2010 14:07 GMT

Filmmaker: Lloyd Ross

Soweto, the African township to the south-west of Johannesburg, is perhaps best-known worldwide for the uprising of 1976.

Today it is a very different community. Local residents, though still among South Africa's most disadvantaged people, are at last beginning to see a share of the "rainbow nation's" prosperity, denied them during the apartheid era.

Living and working in the township is still very demanding, but once a year the inhabitants get to let their hair down at the annual Soweto Beach Party, on an artificial beach beside a disused power station.

The man behind the beach party is G G Alcock, a white man brought up in a Zulu village.

This year he stuck his neck out and hired an Afrikaaner revival band, the Nagloopers, as a bold attempt to see how far the community has developed.

Lloyd Ross' film catalogues the historic first apperance of Afrikaaners taking part in a Soweto pop festival.

But it also examines whether black South Africans will be willing to embrace the music of their former oppressors.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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