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Witness
No White in the Rainbow
We look at the plight of South Africa's white farmers as violent attacks increase.
Last Modified: 28 Apr 2009 11:49 GMT

Watch part two

Filmmaker: Martin Himel

What price is there to pay for being a white farmer in South Africa?

It is meant to be the 'Rainbow Nation', the unification of different races in a country that has witnessed decades of racial segregation and repression, a country that was firmly divided by white and black. The term signified hope for post-apartheid South Africa, a brighter future and a new national identity.

Martin Himmel's film tells a different story.

Violent attacks have increased on the white minorities who are now faced with taking extreme precautions to protect themselves, their families, and their property.

Imagine living in constant fear of being robbed, raped or murdered at gunpoint - this is a widespread crisis South Africa's white farmers are facing.

In what is a critical issue for South Africans of all colours the film also explores the other side to this argument. 

With a huge percentage of agricultural land still owned by white South Africans, who make up only 10 per cent of the population, what is really fair? And should the government give back land to the black majority?

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