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Witness
Beirut Diaries
A diary of the momentous events in Lebanon after the killing of Rafiq al-Hariri.
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2009 09:57 GMT



Watch part two

Filmmaker: Mai Masri

Lebanon is one of the most complex and divided countries in the Middle East. The assassination of Lebanese prime minister, Rafiq al-Hariri, in February 2005, exposed political differences which had long been simmering.

Following the assassination, two opposing visions of Lebanon emerged. One vision was essentially anti-Syrian: its supporters suspected Syrian involvement in Hariri's assassination and called for a Lebanon free from Syrian control. This grouping enjoys the support of the United States. 

The other vision was pro-Syrian: its supporters feared Syria was being falsely accused of Hariri's murder. They believe in a close alliance with Syria in the context of the ongoing Arab-Israeli conflict. This grouping enjoys the backing of Syria and Iran. 

Each group – and each vision - consisted of supporters from across Lebanon's religious spectrum. The old divisions were no more, as new alliances between erstwhile foes were forged. Both sets of supporters staged huge demonstrations in Beirut, which became a sea of protestors and flags.

Film-maker Mai Masri brings us the story of 25-year-old Nadine Zeidan. Nadine joined protestors demanding the withdrawal of Syrian forces from Lebanon. She wrote a diary during these momentous days in Beirut. As events continue to unfold, Nadine's Beirut Diaries help to shed light on the continuing political deadlock in Lebanon. 

Source:
Al Jazeera
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