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Witness
Beirut Under Siege
It's a long hot summer for Katia and her family in Lebanon amid the 2006 war.
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2009 09:53 GMT



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Filmmaker: Katia Saleh

It is a hot summer in Lebanon, as Beirut-born filmmaker Katia Saleh documents how the month-long war between Israel and Hezbollah in July 2006 war affected individual Lebanese families.

While some were unable to leave their homes, others were forced to seek refuge in overcrowded schools and hospitals. One child is determined to finish his drawing while a fraught teacher hurries him to take shelter from the crossfire.

Meanwhile friends still able to boast a power supply receive emails with shocking images of casualties not acceptable for broadcast. For Katia's own mother the decisions whether to leave a home behind and doing whatever it takes to get a precious foreign visa for her daughter, fuel emotional conversations caught on camera.

Your Comments:

It touched me deep inside to watch Katia's story which is very similar to the conflict I went through. I believe most of the viewers would sympathize with her, though few would identify with what she went through. I saw in her film my own experience, my country, my mum's words and an expression of my feelings.
Rania, Qatar

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