Tunisia's "Islamist" Ennahda party announced last month that it was moving away from so-called "political Islam". The announcement is seen as a move to broaden its following by a party that has been labelled "moderate Islamist" for 30 years.

While the move is welcomed by many, others raise questions: Can Muslim-majority countries strike a balance between faith and democracy? Or, is there an irreconcilable tension between liberal values and Islamic beliefs?

In a special edition of UpFront, recorded before Ennahda's announcement, Mehdi Hasan speaks to a panel of experts, analysts and activists about whether there can be a balance between Islamic and democratic values. 

Guests:

Mustafa Akyol, Turkish columnist and author of Islam Without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty. 

Mona Eltahawy, Egyptian-American writer, activist and author of Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution 

Soumaya Ghannoushi, British-Tunisian writer, commentator and member of Tunisia's Ennahda party. 

Shadi Hamid, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution's Center for Middle East Policy and author of Islamic Exceptionalism: How the Struggle Over Islam is Reshaping the World. 

Husain Haqqani, former Pakistani ambassador to the US and author of Pakistan: Between Mosque And Military 

Editor's note: We apologise to our viewers for the technical issues with Mona Eltahawy's connection.

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Source: Al Jazeera