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Tutu's Children

Ndumiso Luthuli: 'Power to the people'

From Durban's townships to the colleges of Oxford, this legal adviser believes in the power of the law.
Last Modified: 10 Jan 2013 15:45
Ndumiso Luthuli believes passionately in the power of the law to protect civil liberties [Matthew Cassel/Al Jazeera]

As a first-hand witness to the anti-apartheid struggle for black emancipation, Ndumiso Luthuli, a legal adviser from South Africa, believes passionately in the power of the law to protect civil liberties.

Having made it from the volatile townships of Durban to the colleges of Oxford, then to his own law firm, he now plays a top role in South African business.

But never shy to express an opinion, will he intimidate people? Or will they just see him as the 'big brother' of the group?

Frustratingly hard to argue with sound logic, Ndumiso rests his case.

What does Africa need?

"The continent needs one to be able to speak up when there is a wrong and when there is a right. Education is key.

"Change needs to be first made at home. For humans to develop they need the economy to first grow. In this case, it does not depend on the different African states, rather that the continent of Africa has [to focus on] one important factor - economic consolidation - to then be able to have a political consolidation.

"[For a good leader] honesty and integrity are important. To be able to have and take the responsibilities and [be] aware of consequences. As a lawyer, good communication is important.



Tutu's Children can be seen from Thursday, January 10, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600.

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Al Jazeera
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