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Tutu's Children

Tatenda Manjengwa: 'The case for development'

Can the financial trader prove that humanitarianism can be reconciled with money-making?
Last Modified: 24 Jan 2013 11:31
Tatenda views wealth creation and education as the two best ways to overcome Africa's key obstacles [Matthew Cassel/Al Jazeera]

For financial trader Tatenda Manjengwa, any move for Africa's future should be all about the bottom line, hand-in-hand with education delivery that will truly empower people.

"There has to be a business case for development."

- Tatenda Manjengwa, a financial trader

Originally from Zimbabwe, Tatenda trades for one of South Africa's biggest banks, Nedbank.

He views wealth creation and education as the two best ways to overcome Africa's key obstacles.

Schooled by the world's top banks and management consultancies, risk-management expert Tatenda's career took a hit when he was laid off from a top job at the height of the financial crisis in 2008.

But seeing a business opportunity, he bounced back and set up his own company, advising decision-makers on how to weather the financial climate.

So can he take Archbishop Tutu's message of moral-driven leadership, and prove that humanitarianism can be reconciled with money-making?


Tutu's Children can be seen from Thursday, January 10, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600.

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