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Tutu's Children

Zied Mhirsi: 'Stoking the fire of democracy'

Fresh from the frontline of Tunisia's revolution, will others find his passion for democracy inspiring or provocative?
Last Modified: 10 Jan 2013 15:48
Zied, who trained as a doctor, has worked on the ground to treat Africa's biggest public health problems [Al Jazeera]

"We are here to establish a new style of leadership, not more dictatorship."

- Dr Zied Mhirsi, a media entrepreneur and public health expert 

Dr Zied Mhirsi, a media entrepreneur and public health expert from Tunisia, is the founder of Tunisia's first English news website, Tunisia Live.

Based in the capital, Tunis, he leads a team of young journalists, hosts radio shows, writes articles and helps non-governmental organisations.

Having been medically trained, he has also worked on the ground to treat Africa's biggest public health problems and taboos.

But fresh from the frontline of Tunisia's revolution, will his fellow Africans find his fire for democracy inspiring or provocative?

Married to singer-songwriter Kesang Marstrand, there are many sides to Zied.

What does Africa need? 

"Democracy is most important. Any previous dictatorship did not work and that is the last thing Africa needs. Believe in the power of people. Africa needs knowledge. Education is really needed.

"To be able to be held accountable as a leader, there needs to be transparency. A leader must understand the people's needs, and [be] easy to influence. A leader must have vision and empower the ones with passion."



Tutu's Children can be seen from Thursday, January 10, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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