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Tutu's Children

Marc van Olst: 'From inventor to investor'

Working with small businesses, he hopes to boost local economies to help catalyse an African economic renaissance.
Last Modified: 10 Jan 2013 15:47
Marc's one nagging doubt is that post-colonial Africa may not yet be ready for a white African leader [Matthew Cassel/Al Jazeera]

A scientist from a privileged background, Marc left his job as a partner with global management consultancy firm McKinsey to become a private investor.

"My mind is racing with all sorts of dangerous thoughts."

- Marc van Olst, a private investor

He now uses his commercial knowledge to assist small businesses that benefit society in some way. By helping them, his vision is to help boost local economies, and in turn help catalyse an African economic renaissance.

Husband, father and fitness fanatic, Marc once invented a patented mining device.

He also climbed Mount Everest. (Ok so he did not, but you believed me did you not?... That is Mr Marc Van Olst)

Marc's one nagging doubt is that post-colonial Africa may not yet be ready for a white African leader. Will his experience during the series give him the answer?

What does Africa need?

"Africa needs a leader to make the continent believe in itself again; someone to shift their perception and create high self esteems.

"Africa's main problems are poverty and dependency. The people are too dependent on charity from developed countries, so there needs to be a mindset shift and this could be achieved through economy.

"A leader should be hardworking and honest. What makes a great leader is strong self-awareness, building and creativity."



Tutu's Children can be seen from Thursday, January 10, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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