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The Cafe
India's great expectations
Indians debate if their country can overcome corruption and a widening wealth gap to become a 21st century superpower.
Last Modified: 21 Dec 2011 16:59

"Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence," this to Charles Dickens was the best way to measure expectations.

With 50 million people considered to be 'middle class,' and economic growth that to some analysts has already outpaced China - Asia's other billion strong emerging economy - Indians should be setting their expectations high.

But with the global financial crisis affecting re-development in the slums of the nation's most populous city, Mumbai, and Anna Hazare accusing the government of attempting to sabotage his 12-day protest fast against corruption, there is evidence that expectations for India may have been set too high.

The Cafe sits down with Indians to have a frank discussion about whether their country can overcome corruption and a widening gap between rich and poor to become a 21st century economic superpower.

 

The Cafe airs each week at the following times GMT: Friday: 2000; Saturday: 1200; Sunday: 0100; Monday: 0600.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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