[QODLink]
Talk to Al Jazeera
Yusuf Raza Gilani
The prime minister of Pakistan discusses contempt charges, relations with the US and the country's powerful military.
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2012 10:15

The number of problems facing Pakistan and its leadership are - even under normal circumstances - daunting: 177 million people, 60 per cent of them living on less than $2-a-day, with child labour a common sight.

Add to that a leadership challenged by the domestic Taliban, frequent drone attacks by the Americans, floods and other natural catastrophes and a powerful military and intelligence establishment that is guarding its power.

Yusuf Raza Gilani, Pakistan's prime minister, stands at the centre of it all. Now the country's Supreme Court is demanding that he push for a corruption case against Asif Ali Zardari, Pakistan's president, or else be charged with contempt.

The contempt accusation arises from Gilani and his advisors ignoring court orders to ask Swiss authorities to reopen corruption cases against Zardari.

There are fears that the case, which has raised tensions between Pakistan's civilian leaders and the court and which could eventually see Gilani jailed, could drag on and risk paralysing the government.

This week, Talk to Al Jazeera sits down with Gilani to discuss, among other things, the Supreme Court's demands, Pakistan's relationship with the US and neighbouring Afghanistan and the balance of power between the country's civilian government and its military.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.