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Sudan: The Break-Up
Sudan: Fight for the soul of the North
As Sudan is split into two, the government in the North faces growing resentment over the loss of national pride.
Last Modified: 13 Apr 2012 14:54

 

This film originally aired in June 2011.

While attention may be on the world's newest state of South Sudan when it declares independence in July, the potential for change in the North is also immense.

As Sudan is split into two, the government of Omar al-Bashir in the North faces growing public resentment over the loss of national pride. To boost his popularity, al-Bashir is likely to appeal to the religiously conservative majority. He has already promised to implement full Sharia law if the South secedes.

Khartoum University stands at the very core of this religious revival and this film will talk to the students (the next generation of political leaders) and their mentors in the academic staff.

The film will also show other perspectives within society – including urbane young professionals, women's rights groups and democracy advocates.

The film will cover the looming issue of water scarcity and how any drop in the water level could spell disaster; the scale of Chinese investment in North Sudan; and the ongoing problematic issues of Abyei and Darfur.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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