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Soapbox Mexico

Vicky's story

One woman recalls desperate years of violent abuse and then witnesses how her life is turned into a telenovela.

Last updated: 26 Nov 2013 07:10
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Soapbox Mexico goes behind the scenes of one of Mexico's longest running and most popular telenovelas which promotes women's rights and positive social change: What Women Don't Say.

Planning a special programme for the upcoming 13 anniversary of the soap, executive producer Alicia asks scriptwriter Araceli to find a case of a woman who has suffered abuse, and recovered, thanks to the programme's message.

Vicky comes forward, and Araceli adapts her story for the programme. In a deeply emotional demonstration of the back-and-forth between reality and fiction, Vicky's real story is played out on set.

Her years of sexual abuse at the hands of a violent husband form the central theme of the episode and arguably reflect real life in Mexico where two out of every three women suffer abuse. Vicky saved herself because she called a helpline advertised at the end of What Women Don't Say.

The theme of speaking out and of breaking silence is very clearly and powerfully realised, as Vicky makes an emotional visit to the set to watch the last scenes of her story being filmed.


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Source:
Al Jazeera
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