[QODLink]
Riz Khan
The US and the green battle
Why is the campaign for green energy not gaining momentum in the US?
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2011 11:08

According to a report by Pew, a US non-profit organisation that provides analysis on public policies, global funding for alternative power grew by more than 30 per cent since 2009, reaching a record $243bn in 2010.

China leads the push for clean energy development, while the US - the world's largest consumer of oil - has fallen to third place.

On Monday's Riz Khan we ask: As crude prices soar to more than $120 dollars a barrel and demands to reduce carbon emissions increase, why isn't the US investing more into renewable energy?

We speak with former Michigan governor, Jennifer Granholm, who now serves as senior adviser at Pew Charitable Trusts, where she promotes clean energy policies; and Robert Bryce, the author of Power Hungry: The Myths of Green Energy and the Real Fuels of the Future also joins the show.

You can watch the show at 1930GMT on Al Jazeera English. Repeats will air next day at 0430GMT, 0830GMT and 1430GMT.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.