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Riz Khan
Libya's lucrative ties
As world leaders condemn violence against protesters, what is at stake for Western nations with close ties to Gaddafi?
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2011 12:52 GMT

Why did the UK government on Monday cancel eight arms export licences for Libya?

This comes after a warning from a legal adviser to the UN Commission on Human Rights who suggested that Britain may be found guilty of "complicity" for the killings of protesters by Muammar Gaddafi's regime.

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In the third quarter of 2010 alone, according to the Campaign Against Arms trade, the UK licensed over $6mn worth of ammunition to Libya, including sniper rifles and crowd control ammunition, which is suspected to have been used by the regime to suppress demonstrators.

Although the UK has condemned the violent attacks on Libya's protesters, in the past it has turned a blind eye to the country's dubious human rights record for fear of risking lucrative oil, trade and arms deals.

On Tuesday we examine the relationship between the two countries with Sir Richard Dalton, the former British ambassador to Libya; Dr. Mohamed al-Magariaf, the co-founder of the National Front for the Salvation of Libya; and Hafed al-Ghwell, a Libyan-American analyst.

This episode of Riz Khan aired from Tuesday, February 22, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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