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Riz Khan
The battle over blasphemy
Has Pakistan's controversial blasphemy law become a political tool in the hands of religious conservatives?
Last Modified: 17 Feb 2011 08:08 GMT

We will be discussing Pakistan's controversial blasphemy law with journalist Shehrbano Taseer whose father - Punjab governor Salman Taseer - was killed for speaking out against it.

The killing ignited a debate in Pakistan with many critics calling for the law to be amended or scrapped, saying it was being used to victimise liberal politicians and religious minorities.

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But extremist groups have celebrated Taseer's killer, calling him a hero who is defending Islam.

So has the blasphemy law become a political tool and should it have a place in today's Pakistan?

Also joining the discussion will be Asma Jahangir, a well-known human rights activist, and Amjad Waheed, an Islamic scholar.

You can join the conversation. Watch this episode of Riz Khan on Thursday, February 17, at 1930GMT. Repeats will air on Friday at 0430GMT, 0830GMT and 1430GMT.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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