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Riz Khan
The G-zero world
Economists argue that without clear leadership we may be facing another economic meltdown.
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2011 10:59 GMT

Two years after the G20 attempted to pull the world out of a global economic downturn, will the group that promised cooperation actually end up creating conflict?

During the 2008 worldwide economic crisis, leading industrialised nations welcomed the involvement of emerging countries in the fight to rescue the world economy.

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Although the crisis has eased, cracks have emerged. Many say the G20's lack of leadership and competing economic interests could cause conflict over crucial issues such as global financial coordination, trade policies, and climate change.

With the Group of 20 economic powers set to meet in Paris this week, we ask whether the bloc has the political power and economic motivation to drive a truly international agenda.

On Wednesday, we will be discussing the issues with world-renowned economist Nouriel Roubini as well as the president and founder of the Eurasia Group, Ian Bremmer.

This episode of Riz Khan aired from Wednesday, February 16, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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