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Riz Khan
The Egypt effect
Thousands of people are taking to streets across the region demanding political and social reform.
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2011 11:07 GMT

Tens of thousands of people in countries such as Algeria, Jordan and Yemen are taking to the streets, demanding complete political and social overhaul. Their leaders have promised changes but protesters say that is not enough.

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The latest demonstrations in Arab nations are inspired by the popular uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt that forced their leaders from power.

What lies in store for Egypt and Tunisia after their leaders were forced from power and how are those developments playing out in the rest of the Arab world?

On Tuesday, we will be discussing these issues with Sami Ben Gharbia, the co-founder of the Tunisian website Nawaat.org; Wael Abbas, an Egyptian activist whose regular tweets from Tahrir Square were followed avidly during the uprising; Mauritanian-American Nasser Weddady from the American Islamic Congress, which promotes social media activism in the Arab world; and Naseem Tarawnah, a Jordanian blogger.

You can join the conversation. Watch this episode of Riz Khan on Tuesday, February 15, at 1930GMT. Repeats will air on Wednesday at 0430GMT, 0830GMT and 1430GMT.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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