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Riz Khan
Egypt's elections
Will the upcoming vote preserve Egypt's so-called 'sham-ocracy' or move the country towards reform?
Last Modified: 23 Nov 2010 11:23 GMT

Will upcoming parliamentary elections preserve Egypt's "sham-ocracy" - as critics call it - or move the country towards a legitimate path of reform?

The ruling National Democratic Party is expected to maintain its parliamentary majority during the November 28 poll, but many are questioning how fair the electoral process will be.

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So far Egypt has rejected calls for foreign election monitoring, calling it a violation of its sovereignty.

Meanwhile, hundreds of opposition party members have been jailed and critics of the government have been silenced in the latest crackdown on the news media.

Some opposition parties are also calling for a boycott of the vote.

On Monday's Riz Khan show we ask: How can political reform in Egypt move forward?

We speak to Karim Haggag, the director of the Egyptian Information Office in Washington; Adel Iskandar, a media scholar at Georgetown University; and Basem Fathy, a political activist and director of the Egyptian Democracy Academy in Cairo.

You can join the conversation with your questions and comments. Watch the show live on Monday November 22, at 1630GMT. Repeats air at 2030GMT, and the next day at 0130GMT.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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